Observation Hill, a vonvel of class and murder.

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What's it about?

 

Labor  tension though the early 20th century in Duluth, Minnesota was high,  fueled by influx of workers from egalitarian Scandinavia. The post World  War II fight was settled in the workers' favor. As the century moved on  though conditions changed.
Class  struggle in Observation Hill erupts inside police detective, Paul  Tuomi, as he investigates the deaths of an heiress from the patrician  East End and an underclass teen in the laboring West End. When police  resources shift to the eastern end of town, leaving a cloud of suspicion  on the young man's passing, Paul is told to back off but, instead,  doubles his effort to clear the youth's name.
Out  east, with pressure from the press and the powerful to arrest the black  sheep of the heiress's family, Paul is pushed to disregard eye-witness  fact and bring to heel his West End sensibilities or face demotion on  his job, the end of his marriage, and the loss of his long-time lover. 
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Awards

Northeaster Minnesota Book Awards

Finalist

Buy it at Finns Way Books

Best Review

 I should start by disclosing that I was an advance reader of this book, and an early sympathizer. In the crush of things it's easy to lose mental track of something you haven't seen for about a year--even if books are not as perishable as movies. In a good read, you are re-creating the book as you go, while movies more often than not are done to you. This novel by Tim Jollymore is the essence of liberty. It opens wide the door to a place you haven't seen. While giving you just the amount of guidance you need, it invites you to roam in its vast and interesting spaces. As I was reminded when I checked off the questions supplied by Amazon, Observation Hill manages to be quite racy without ever crossing the line into those dispiriting regions of graphic sex and violence that the conventions of modern storytelling have mandated. This is elegant storytelling that packs a punch. At its best, it reaches what the Finnish poet Lassi Nummi has called «the music behind the music». And when the story is done, it's the musical essence which stays in the memory, as intimate as a quartet or as big as a symphony. This is great writing which allows for great reading, and will live in you for a good long time after your encounter with it.   
 * Dabi Sanchez is a San Francisco poet and playwright and the literary alter-ego of David Landau,author of KISSENGER and the novel DEATH IS NOT ALWAYS THE WINNER.  the music. And when the story is done, it's the musical essence which  stays in the memory, as intimate as a quartet or as big as a symphony.  This is great writing which allows for great reading, and will live in  you for a good long time after your encounter with it. 

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